Why might Christians vote for Trump?

The Melbourne Anglican

Pete Mulherin

NOVEMBER 2

Some US Christians are in a jam: they don’t know who to vote for on 8 November, and while the vacancy in the White House needs filling, they may be more concerned with the current opening in the Supreme Court.

Reasons abound as to why Christians might not vote for Donald Trump in the upcoming election. Even so, don’t be shocked if lots of them do. And not only the white, redneck, gun-wielding, ignorant, pickup-driving minority of Americans that many in the mainstream media seem to think are typical of US Christians. But rather the thinking, compassionate and generous people who are doubtless feeling very conflicted about their choices for president.

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‘Inherent requirements’ test will undermine, not strengthen, pluralistic society

By Mark Sneddon and Pete Mulherin

The Melbourne Anglican

OCTOBER 20

The distinction between faith-based independent schools and government schools in matters of religious conviction and conscience is being undermined by the proposed Equal Opportunity (Religious Exceptions) Bill introduced by the Andrews government in Victoria. The Bill will override the deeply held wishes of many parents for their children to be educated in the tenets of a particular faith, as well as in an environment that encourages and models a distinct way to live. Similarly, religious organisations other than schools, from charities to churches, will be prohibited from applying a test of conformity with the group’s faith in many employment decisions. Continue reading

About Face: Who Speaks on Behalf of Australia’s Muslims?

Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull hosted an Iftar dinner celebrating Ramadan at Kirribilli House in Sydney on Thursday 16 June 2016. Guests included broadcaster Waleed Aly and his wife Susan Carland. Picture: Andrew Meares / Fairfax Media

The inclusion of prominent Australian Muslim clerics with reprehensible views in Malcolm Turnbull’s recent end of fasting celebration (Iftar) during Ramadan has the potential to precipitate a long-overdue conversation: what do mainstream Muslims in Australia really think?

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Evolution, Galileo & God

Something that should have been mentioned in the first post in this series on atheism and Christianity is that I don’t think rational arguments—like those Jesse and I are attempting to make—are in themselves enough to lead one to a Christian faith. Alister McGrath says it much better than I can, so I’ll let him explain:

Rational argument does not create belief, but it maintains a climate in which belief may flourish. To demonstrate the reasonableness of faith does not mean proving every article of faith. Rather, it means showing that there are good grounds for believing that these are trustworthy and reliable. It also means showing that the Christian faith makes sense of what we observe and experience.

So it’s with this in mind that I engage in this debate; not under some expectation that the arguments themselves have enough power to convince, but rather in the hope that the debate may remove obstacles to faith.

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Please, Waleed, Clichés Won’t Suffice

love-hate

ISIS says Islam is one thing and Waleed Aly insists it is nothing of the kind. Unless he is prepared to address and explain the if-and-why of Koranic literalism,  I’ll remain confused. Absent that, Aly’s latest sermon is an empty polemic, clarifying nothing.