Shining the Light on Slavery in Supply-Chains – A Modern Slavery Act for Australia

Institute for Civil Society

Mark Sneddon & Pete Mulherin

Modern slavery rarely uses the shackles, whips, ships’ holds, and slave markets historically associated with the transatlantic slave trade of the 18th and 19th centuries. Britain legislated to abolish slavery in 1833 after years of lobbying by William Wilberforce and others. But slavery has not gone away. As far as the world may have come since the UK’s Abolition Act of 1833, and Abraham Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation of 1863, according to the International Labour Organization (ILO) over 21 million people remain in forced labour worldwide. Over 11.5 million of these are in Australia’s neighbourhood, the Asia-Pacific. This modern slavery generates a staggering US$51 billion in our region alone; a figure which explains the slave-economy’s enduring existence.

Full article at http://www.i4cs.com.au/shining-the-light-on-slavery/ 

 

‘Inherent requirements’ test will undermine, not strengthen, pluralistic society

By Mark Sneddon and Pete Mulherin

The Melbourne Anglican

OCTOBER 20

The distinction between faith-based independent schools and government schools in matters of religious conviction and conscience is being undermined by the proposed Equal Opportunity (Religious Exceptions) Bill introduced by the Andrews government in Victoria. The Bill will override the deeply held wishes of many parents for their children to be educated in the tenets of a particular faith, as well as in an environment that encourages and models a distinct way to live. Similarly, religious organisations other than schools, from charities to churches, will be prohibited from applying a test of conformity with the group’s faith in many employment decisions. Continue reading

Where are we going? Australia in a post-IS Iraq & Syria

You can be excused for forgetting that Australia is waging war in Syria and Iraq, with national security and foreign affairs so far off the political radar this election. Bill Shorten and Malcolm Turnbull’s failure to properly discuss our current and future military commitment in the Middle East is nonetheless inexcusable. The Islamic State is on the back foot, as the attacks on Fallujah, in Iraq, and Raqqa, in Syria demonstrate. While their demise as a semi-conventional army and the loss of territorial control may still be many months away, the fact remains that mopping up IS was always going to be the easiest task.

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Trivial or important? ‘Lifestyle choices’ or good policy?

Tony Abbott in Kalgoorlie

There is a difference between ‘lifestyle choices’ and ‘way of life’. The former carries underlying judgement, the latter respect and a level of understanding.

Or at least that’s how it looks to me.

Apparently Tony Abbot either doesn’t agree or didn’t think about it when he suggested that taxpayer money should not be used to fund certain small Aboriginal settlements based on the inhabitants’ ‘lifestyle choice’ of living there in the first place.

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