Archipelago or Landmass? Voluntary Associations, Civil Society and the Health of Liberal Democracy

The antidote to the slow yet real monopolisation of community by the state is a strong civil society and the voluntary associations that thrive within it.

Voluntary associations are key to protecting diversity in a pluralistic society, write Pete Mulherin and Simon P. Kennedy in the Centre for Independent Studies’ quarterly POLICY Magazine.

Read the full article here.

Shining the Light on Slavery in Supply-Chains – A Modern Slavery Act for Australia

Institute for Civil Society

Mark Sneddon & Pete Mulherin

Modern slavery rarely uses the shackles, whips, ships’ holds, and slave markets historically associated with the transatlantic slave trade of the 18th and 19th centuries. Britain legislated to abolish slavery in 1833 after years of lobbying by William Wilberforce and others. But slavery has not gone away. As far as the world may have come since the UK’s Abolition Act of 1833, and Abraham Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation of 1863, according to the International Labour Organization (ILO) over 21 million people remain in forced labour worldwide. Over 11.5 million of these are in Australia’s neighbourhood, the Asia-Pacific. This modern slavery generates a staggering US$51 billion in our region alone; a figure which explains the slave-economy’s enduring existence.

Full article at http://www.i4cs.com.au/shining-the-light-on-slavery/ 

 

Why might Christians vote for Trump?

The Melbourne Anglican

Pete Mulherin

NOVEMBER 2

Some US Christians are in a jam: they don’t know who to vote for on 8 November, and while the vacancy in the White House needs filling, they may be more concerned with the current opening in the Supreme Court.

Reasons abound as to why Christians might not vote for Donald Trump in the upcoming election. Even so, don’t be shocked if lots of them do. And not only the white, redneck, gun-wielding, ignorant, pickup-driving minority of Americans that many in the mainstream media seem to think are typical of US Christians. But rather the thinking, compassionate and generous people who are doubtless feeling very conflicted about their choices for president.

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‘Inherent requirements’ test will undermine, not strengthen, pluralistic society

By Mark Sneddon and Pete Mulherin

The Melbourne Anglican

OCTOBER 20

The distinction between faith-based independent schools and government schools in matters of religious conviction and conscience is being undermined by the proposed Equal Opportunity (Religious Exceptions) Bill introduced by the Andrews government in Victoria. The Bill will override the deeply held wishes of many parents for their children to be educated in the tenets of a particular faith, as well as in an environment that encourages and models a distinct way to live. Similarly, religious organisations other than schools, from charities to churches, will be prohibited from applying a test of conformity with the group’s faith in many employment decisions. Continue reading